Blogs

Reuther Library receives Michigan Humanities Council Grant

(354) Riots, Rebellions, Civil Unrest, Detroit, July 1967

The Reuther Library is proud to announce that it has been awarded a Humanities Grant from the Michigan Humanities Council. The grant will support an exhibit of selected materials related to Detroit’s 1967 Civil Unrest, taken from the Reuther's over 40 archival collections on the topic. The exhibit will be installed in the Reuther Library’s atrium in April 2017 and will be accompanied by a web exhibit and document sets for use in K-12 classrooms. Visitors will learn about analyzing archival material and begin to understand the archive as a place that belongs to the community it serves.  read more »

Oral History Heroes: Millie Jeffrey

Portraits, Mildred Jeffrey, Undated

As the Oral History Project Archivist at the Reuther Library, my job is to arrange and describe our oral history collections so researchers can find them -- work that has been made possible by a National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) Documenting Democracy grant awarded to the library in 2014. I’ve come to greatly admire many of the interviewees, and to be fascinated by their life stories and accomplishments. In a series of blog posts, I’ll tell about some of my “oral history heroes” and what makes them special to me.  read more »

Exhibit Announcement: Bruce Harkness Poletown Photographs

(31832) Poletown, Land Clearances, Children, Detroit, 1981

Visit the Reuther Library's Woodcock Wing gallery now through spring 2017 for an exhibition of photographs of Detroit's Poletown by photographer Bruce Harkness.  read more »

Winter Break—University Closure

The Walter P. Reuther Library of Labor and Urban Affairs will close at 4pm, December 23rd, 2016 for Winter Break. We'll return to our regular business hours on Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017. Please contact us if you have any questions. Ask An Archivist

Collection Spotlight: UAW Local 174 Mural

(35325) Local 174 Mural, "Untitled," 1937

In 1937, United Auto Workers Local 174 sponsored the creation of a series of murals to enliven their Union Hall and celebrate their rich, if relatively young, history. The resulting work proved to be one of the most memorable pieces of Detroit’s New Deal-era artwork.  read more »

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